Wednesday, 2 April 2014

Weight Management

Weight Management – Part 2


Empty Calories

The term applies to food that supplies food energy but little or no other nutrition. Foods containing empty calories typically contain processed carbohydrates and ethanol (alcohol), and to some extent fats. Also known as a discretionary calorie, an empty calorie has the same energy content as any other calorie but lacks many accompanying nutrients such as vitamins, dietary minerals, antioxidants, amino acids, or dietary fiber. The Body requires certain essential nutrients, but food energy intake must be balanced with the physical activity to maintain a proper body weight. People who engage in heavy physical activity need food energy as fuel, which can be supplied by empty calories in addition to foods with essential nutrients. Sedentary person and those eating less to lose weight may suffer malnutrition if they eat food supplying empty calories but not enough nutrients.
The following foods are often considered to contain mostly empty calories and may lead to weight gain:
  • Cake, cookies, sweets, candy, ice cream, soft drinks, fruit-flavored beverages and gelatin and other foods containing added sugars (including High-fructose corn syrup, HFCS)
  • Margarine or shortening, and other fats and oils (although some consumption of fats is essential to health)
  • Beer, wine, and other alcoholic beverages
Take following example of a mini lunch at your nearest fast food outlet

Order
Energy (kCal)
Protein (g)
Fats (g)
Carbo-hydrates (g)

AlooTikki
352
8
14
49
Coke-250 ml
110
0
0
27
Regular Fries
343
5
17
41
Total per lunch
805
13
31
117

Take a closure look at the last row of total energy intake and protein, fats and carbs intake

Take another example of a mini meal at your nearest pizza outlet

Order
Energy (kCal)
Protein (g)
Fats (g)
Carbo-hydrates (g)
Balanced Diet

6" PAN Veggie Pizza
455
21
11
66
Pepsi-250 ml
110
0
0
27
Garlic Bread-Regular
426
6
24
46
Total Per Pizza meal
991
27
35
139

Take a closure look at the last row of total energy intake and protein, fats and carbs intake Now consider the example of a heavy Indianlunch at your home.

Serving
Portion (g)
Calories
(cal)
Carbohydrates
(g)
Protein
(g)
Total Fat
(g)
Roti
4
446
72.22
11.75
11.20
Sabji
100
123
10.68
2.22
4.63
Rice
100
148
25.67
3.23
3.67
Dal
50
57
5.65
3.06
0.89
Average per meal
Avg
774
114.21
20.26
20.39

Take a closure look at the last row of total energy intake and protein, fats and carbs intake It is very evident that even the heaviest lunch at our home (for heavy work) would give more nutrients than the cheapest lunch at fast food center at a cost of lower energy, fats and carbohydrates. Again the amount of vitamins and minerals in a home lunch would be much higher. Micro- nutrients in fast food are nearly absent.

So here are the top foods you can consider in your diet if you have any weight management plans:

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